Author Topic: Engine teardown and inspection  (Read 7838 times)

Offline Trigger

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #75 on: November 22, 2020, 01:16:56 AM »
Not sure what you have on the back of the shells but, they should be dry to the case and rods  ;)

Offline Skoti

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #76 on: November 22, 2020, 09:36:28 AM »
Nice job and great photos,

I've never seen the crank journals greased up like that before assembly, is that standard practice?

I normally just oil them lightly.


Good luck with the rebuild

Skoti.
Motorcycling is Life, anything B4 or after is just waiting...


1976 Honda CB750F1

Offline cantarauk

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #77 on: November 22, 2020, 01:33:54 PM »
Tigger metal on metal got it. Will clean and re-seat the shells

Skoti - Cheers. The crank and conrods both came back like that from the machine shop covered in grease and to be honest I too quiet a bit off before connecting up and dropping in.

This is what it came back like - Crankshaft was covered thicker



Offline philward

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #78 on: November 22, 2020, 02:04:20 PM »
Nice job and great photos,

I've never seen the crank journals greased up like that before assembly, is that standard practice?

I normally just oil them lightly.


Good luck with the rebuild

Skoti.

Most of the experts on here recommend using Grafogen (proberly spelt wrong!) as an assembly grease - to ensure pre oil pressure lubrication of metal to metal surfaces such as big ends, mains, cam journals, etc.
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Offline cantarauk

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #79 on: November 22, 2020, 09:52:14 PM »
Need three things checking please as I hope some of these are correct but could do with a Jedi/Expert opinion to validate.

For the Countershaft assembly No 19 and No 20 on the image is the way I put these washer back correct



The way I put these back below but I am more interest in washer 20 to see if the turned pieces went in the correct way. No 19 I assumed is the flat washer and No No 20 the washer that has bent ears for the I/D piece.






The second thing I need checking is with the Mainshaft when I stripped it down there were 2 washers where No 18 is.



I started putting this back without the second washer. Below is what I found when I stripped the Main shaft down for cleaning.





The 3rd query is reading the Haynes manual when inserting the second drive it says - " Ensure that a new oil seal has been fitted to the secondary drive sprocket end of the layshaft and that a new O ring positioned behind the oil spacer" From the parts images above I can't see this O ring only the one that fits between the bearing and the fixed positioner on the mainshaft No 3.

page where I read this added below -



I did not remove the bearing No 22 all the way to No 7 only No 19 to No 24 for cleaning. So assume O ring No 27 is still there
 
« Last Edit: November 26, 2020, 09:21:02 AM by cantarauk »

Offline Skoti

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #80 on: November 23, 2020, 08:42:06 AM »
Nice job and great photos,

I've never seen the crank journals greased up like that before assembly, is that standard practice?

I normally just oil them lightly.


Good luck with the rebuild

Skoti.

Most of the experts on here recommend using Grafogen (proberly spelt wrong!) as an assembly grease - to ensure pre oil pressure lubrication of metal to metal surfaces such as big ends, mains, cam journals, etc.



Phil,

thanks for the Graphogen tip, it's something we never used or had in the seventies when I worked in a Honda franchise. Although I remember using something similar during the eighties in the motor trade whilst renewing MK1 Astra camshafts.

As ever I'm always learning new stuff from the posts and fantastic photo documented rebuilds on this website.

Regards

Skoti

 
Motorcycling is Life, anything B4 or after is just waiting...


1976 Honda CB750F1

Offline Bryanj

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #81 on: November 23, 2020, 09:49:16 AM »
I was delivering car perts when the Astra/Cavalier had the cam troubles and every dealer was waiting for camshaft/follower sets.
There used to be a proceedure for first start up, something like 3 minutes at 4000 rpm followed by 2 minutes at 2000 rpm before you let it tick over. Something to do with oil flow quantity

Offline cantarauk

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #82 on: November 26, 2020, 01:26:50 PM »
Any comments to the post on 22nd about washer an o-ring question

Offline Bryanj

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #83 on: November 26, 2020, 03:57:00 PM »
Would it be part 27

Offline cantarauk

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #84 on: November 26, 2020, 04:08:50 PM »
Bryan,

Thinking about again it must be as the spacer is the bearing looking think attached to the shaft itself. Now I never removed all the gears on that shaft as I could not figure out how to get No 7 off. Would it be best to try again and replace the o-ring or would I be good with that one.

Also any view on the extra washer that was on mainshaft ?

Offline Bryanj

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #85 on: November 26, 2020, 09:23:46 PM »
Never changed one so dont know

Offline Oddjob

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #86 on: November 26, 2020, 11:10:58 PM »
The O-Ring 27 is between the bearing and the collar on the shaft, it’s really thin IIRC and isn’t visible until you remove the bearing, which I’ve only had to do once. I suspect part 19 is the eared washer with 20 being what’s called the thrust washer. I should have both those washers NOS along with every gear and shaft except 1 for a complete NOS gearbox, if so I’ll compare part numbers to see which is which.
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Offline cantarauk

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #87 on: November 27, 2020, 09:33:42 AM »
Thanks both.

For now I have assembled as per the photos with the flat washer first toward the sprocket end against No7 and then the ear-washer after with the ears towards No 9. So from your understanding could be wrong. Oddjob, If you could please check the part numbers it would be appreciated.

Offline Oddjob

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #88 on: November 27, 2020, 09:34:46 AM »
Will have a look tonight when I get home.
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Offline Trigger

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Re: Engine teardown and inspection
« Reply #89 on: November 27, 2020, 01:51:32 PM »
Had a little time today so, split this gear box so, you can see how it split as you can't go off a manual  ;)

The circlips must be wround the correct way as, there is a flat side. The washer with the tags fits inside the washer once that washer is turned and acts as a lock.


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« Last Edit: November 27, 2020, 01:59:16 PM by Trigger »

 

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