Author Topic: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration  (Read 4988 times)

Offline Jamesh_sussex

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #180 on: October 23, 2018, 06:56:18 PM »
Looking great Dave. Who did the seat re-cover for you with the metallic piping?


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Offline Davelu88

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #181 on: October 23, 2018, 08:04:13 PM »
Bikes looking good & paintwork  looks great , im hoping for my box from Germany will come soon  ;D

Offline MrDavo

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #182 on: October 24, 2018, 01:06:41 PM »
Another shot showing the seat with the tank, it came new from Texvina in Vietnam, James, its extra with the silver strip, if anyone orders, the cheaper priced version doesn't have it.

1969 Honda CL450 'Dual Sport'
1971 Honda CB750 K1 'General Export Type' (from South Africa)
1985 Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Sport
2005 Harley XL1200R Sportster

Offline Jamesh_sussex

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #183 on: October 24, 2018, 03:42:35 PM »
Looks a very decent copy Dave. Good job..


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Offline MrDavo

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #184 on: November 06, 2018, 02:26:12 PM »
Well we've been at this for nearly a year now, the first photos of the bike as delivered are dated 16 November 2017. I never wanted to finish it too quickly, as a man needs a hobby, I'd only go and buy another project ( classic VW camper van anyone?). However it is 50 next year, so it would be nice to resurrect her for her Golden Jubilee, it could even show up at Crich 2019.

I had a go at restoring the side panel badges, and soon realised that the best result I was going to get was 'less scruffy' - although the faded painted sections are recessed and therefore easy to do, the plated sections were very tatty and finely scratched.

In the end I decided that as the newly painted side panels were so nice, tatty badges were just going to let the bike down. At that point I picked up my iPad, and ordered the expensive new ones from BadgeReplicas Australia. That was Friday night, so I was quite surprised that they turned up with the postman today (Tuesday)! Postage wasn't cheap but obviously you get the service you pay for. It took me two days to get there myself. I also had constant emails updating me of progress. No taxes or duties, which was good. Cheaper badges are available on eBay, but beware, the ones sold in threes are stickers, not the same at all.

These are super quality, thicker than the originals but very nice chrome and paint. One of the originals is shown for comparison.



After that it was only a matter of time before I stuck them on. The new centre grommet and screw are from an Italian CB450 kit I bought on eBay, strangely enough supplied from California.



If my mate the human engine hoist (6ft 7) is available Saturday, I may lob the engine back in, which should really get me going again.

No top yoke yet, but I'm not fussed as James has a pair of K1 ones, and Silvers actually list the K2 one as available NOS! As my chassis is a K2 number I reckon it must fit, but we will see. Or eBay will provide, it hasn't let me down yet, apart from the odd non fitting part. Meanwhile I put the original on, if you fasten one end of the guage bracket you can't see the other end is missing, which is how I bought it. When I finally do something about it and fit the yoke / damper etc, any recommendations for fork oil? The manual says use ATF, but I've also read that its about SAE 5W and rubbish at damping.
1969 Honda CL450 'Dual Sport'
1971 Honda CB750 K1 'General Export Type' (from South Africa)
1985 Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Sport
2005 Harley XL1200R Sportster

Offline Bryanj

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #185 on: November 06, 2018, 04:52:22 PM »
Fork oil is a bit of a mystery realy, back then specific fork oil did not exist and atf tended to be specified as it did not "froth" like ordinary oil. Personally i would try 10w fork oil and see how it works, you can then go thinner or thicker and, compared to what has already been spent, does not cost the earth.

Offline MrDavo

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #186 on: November 06, 2018, 06:21:36 PM »
Thanks Bryan, I've ordered a litre of 10W - there's 295cc in each leg so 500cc isn't enough. I'm pretty sure that I put ATF in the CB750, without problem, but if I go off road on the CL450 its going to get a hard time.

I need to pm Nurse Julie and order an O-ring / filter kit for my petcock, as they will have gone rock hard.
1969 Honda CL450 'Dual Sport'
1971 Honda CB750 K1 'General Export Type' (from South Africa)
1985 Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Sport
2005 Harley XL1200R Sportster

Offline Bryanj

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #187 on: November 06, 2018, 07:04:27 PM »
Dont forget to replace the washers under the holding screws or fuel will leak straight through. I have used 6mm dowty type with cap screws before now with sucess.

Offline K2-K6

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #188 on: November 06, 2018, 07:16:40 PM »
They are basically the same I think. 

The reason for 5 viscosity is that it's easier to maintain that over a huge temperature range without intervention chemically.  So automatic transmissions and hydraulic systems (dampers) have the same properties demanded. The systems are designed from the beginning to work with lower viscosity rather than being a compromise.
Both also need anti-foam to prevent aeration,  this is usually some type of silicon polymer as I understand it.

To this point they could be considered the same.

Fork oil then adds PTFE (also named as Teflon if they pay money to use the trade description)  this is to reduce stiction,  the effect of still moving the fork's sliding bearings while trying to bend them backwards under braking load.

Most bikes are going to be ok on 5 or 10 but if you go too high it won't be the spring that resists compression of the fork but hydraulic locking.  It'll make the front bob up and down by using the tire as a spring.

Don't think ATF uses PTFE as it'll not help the clutches in the autobox.

Offline MrDavo

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #189 on: November 07, 2018, 05:58:24 PM »
You learn stuff every day on here :)

In other news I am hoping to get the back brake drum polished later tonight, so I can refit the back wheel and have a rolling chassis again, but my plans to get the engine back in on Saturday may be put on hold as the engine hoist is broken - the wife visited him today with a Birthday present for his girlfriend, to find him laid up with a bad back!

Lugging around my CL450 engine probably isn't high on the things he'd like to do list at present, especially if wriggling it about to get the starter motor to clear the front frame tube at the same time as clearing the top rail is as much faff on the way back in as it was on the way out. I'm not doing it myself, as then we'd both have a dodgy back - older people and old bikes are a dodgy mix sometimes, I used to think nothing of pulling big Brit twin engines out on my own.
1969 Honda CL450 'Dual Sport'
1971 Honda CB750 K1 'General Export Type' (from South Africa)
1985 Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Sport
2005 Harley XL1200R Sportster

Offline MrDavo

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Re: 1969 CL450 US Barn Find Restoration
« Reply #190 on: November 12, 2018, 03:32:30 PM »
Serious milestone on Saturday, as the engine went back in!

Here is my glamorous assistant, his back was better, and I did help as much as I could.


Considering the struggle we had getting the thing out, we were both a bit surprised as to how easily it went back in. I guess learning what snagged on the way out helped us avoid problems, also I didn't bother with loads of foam or material, we decided touching up any scratches would be easier.



Putting on a load of parts now, just to see what it would look like one day when finished, just to take them off again to get on with the rebuild, would be silly, but... oh sod it!





Knowing just how good looking it's going to be will keep me motivated over the long winter nights. As good looking as any other CL I've seen, almost exactly a year since I bid on the barn find.

My mate, at 6'7" pointed out how small it all looks, I'm 'only' 6 foot, but sitting on it she feels small to me - it's a long time since I had a bike less than 500cc. The carbs have gone off to another mate for an ultrasonic bath - one was clean inside, the other full of fur.

1969 Honda CL450 'Dual Sport'
1971 Honda CB750 K1 'General Export Type' (from South Africa)
1985 Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Sport
2005 Harley XL1200R Sportster